Ruined Shots #2

I love photographing children. I love their smiles and how unabashed they seem, particularly the ones in Asia.  Most of them pretend to be shy until they see your camera (in my case anyway).  They find it curious that you’re interested in what they’re doing.  One of the things I also love about photographing children in Asia is that they seem to be happy playing anywhere, no matter what.

As much as I love photographing children, it’s a bit hard at times when they’re running about and you have a manual focus camera.  If I have my TLR, they normally stop and stare at it, which makes it easier on my part. Unfortunately, with my rangefinder, kids barely notice that I’m there and I can’t seem to focus fast enough. I sometimes get confused between the focusing ring and the ring where I adjust my aperture (they’re literally beside each other). It’s even harder sometimes with my TLR, and worse if I actually get a shot in focus but fail to take the photo like my last ruined shot.

I still like the photo below, but I kind of wish I was faster with my focusing.  I’ll just have to practice more.

mumbledjumbles-sarah li cain - lou hu1


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Ordinary Wonders

back alley of a restaurant

It’s interesting how much more you photograph when you are in a foreign country. I think that if a similar scene presented itself here in the USA, I probably would pass it on by. I wonder why that is? Is the trick to good photography to train yourself to look at all the scenes around you as new and foreign?

Even looking back when I was in foreign countries, in the beginning I would scoff at taking photos of such scenes. I wanted to take cool scenes of people and what I thought people would like, and not what I found interesting. It wasn’t until I started wandering around by myself that I let my guard down about having to take ‘wow’ photos and just looking around and analyzing what I thought was intriguing.  Clicking the shutter almost became intuitive at that point. I also learned that every photo I looked at, I could remember the exact moment I took it and why I liked the scene.

So perhaps photography isn’t necessarily about taking that great photo, but to appreciate all that is around you.  Capturing the photo is just a tangible way to show everyone else.

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I’m sorry I haven’t been updating as much as I’d like. Life got in the way, and photographing subjects just isn’t as easy as it used to be. I yearn to get out there and do more. I am hopeful for 2013 and what treasures it will bring, and I will concentrate on my photography more. I’m going to go through my archives and see what I would like to share in the upcoming days/weeks.

Until then, Happy Holidays to you all and I look forward to all your creative works.

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